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How to Write a Resume for a Teenager With No Job Experience

Best Resume Format for Teens

❶For example, your resume could include any of the following:

Your First Job Resume: What It Is and Why You Need It

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If you are a teenager looking for your first payroll job, punch up your resume by focusing on your strengths, whatever they may be. Plenty of your high school experiences, from academic achievements to volunteer work to extracurricular activities, offer opportunities to highlight the qualities you can bring to the workplace.

If this is your first resume, don't worry. Getting started is easy. You can build a resume from scratch using word processing software, such as Microsoft Word or Corel WordPerfect, or use a template prepackaged with the software to make a professional resume with a minimal need for word processing skills.

If you choose to build your own, remember to use a standard font, such as Times New Roman or Arial, and use an average size, such as 12 point, for the body of the copy. The Mayor's Youth Council of Boston Resume Guide recommends saving the bold type or larger fonts for your name to make sure it stands out for potential employers.

Your name should be at the top of your resume, followed by your home address, email address and telephone number. Resumes generally start with an objective statement that allows you to specify the position you want and, when possible, your qualifications for the gig.

When on the hunt for your first job, you can either craft an objective statement or move right into the body of your resume. For an objective statement, focus on the specific job you want or a general job type and then highlight your qualifications. When applying for a job at a local supermarket, focus on the customer service aspect of the job and what makes you the ideal candidate, for example, "Seeking a position in customer service and an opportunity to use my outgoing personality to assist customers at Grocery World.

When you are still in high school, your education section will be brief. Create a subheading and list your school's name, expected graduation year and current GPA, such as "Town High School, Class of , 3. If you've branched out and also taken college courses, list them under education as well. Lead with the name of the college and its city and state on a line in bold type. Underneath, list the courses taken.

For overachievers with an associate degree — or higher — list your college name and city and state, plus the year you received your degree on the top line separated by commas. On the next line, list the degree, for example, Associate of Science in Business Administration. Always highlight a high GPA if you've earned it to set yourself apart. It can be featured on a line underneath your degree or separated from your degree by a comma.

LiveCareer has resume templates and resume examples that can provide guidance on header font size and style. Check out this article for the full scoop on how to write a resume summary. Waiting tables is a pretty common teen job. Waiting tables is also difficult and demanding work. The job requires careful attention to detail, strong listening skills, great customer service skills, and the ability to sell items by making recommendations and pitching specials.

But let your employers know that you plan to do more than the minimum, and keep that in mind when mentioning accomplishments on your resume. Teenagers are lazy and careless on the job. Prove that stereotype wrong by emphasizing a track record of timeliness and traits that suggest reliability and maturity, such as working well with superiors, and working well in a team environment.

Consider including along with your resume one or two prepared letters of recommendation from teachers, coaches, or community leaders that speak about your outstanding qualities and skills. Again, employers want reassurance that you know how to buckle down, make commitments, follow through, and do an awesome job. At your age, a great candidate is a candidate with a positive attitude, a willingness to learn, a sense of judgment, and a strong work ethic.

Easier said than done, for most people. Typos are an absolute employer buzzkill. Fantastic candidates of all ages have been rejected outright because their amazing resumes included one nasty spelling mistake they should have picked up on.


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Tips for Writing a Resume for Teenagers. When you are writing a high school resume, it’s important to make sure you include all the pertinent information in an acceptable standard canlimacizlemek.tk want your resume to clearly show the employer what kind of employee you’ll be.

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Here's the good news: You probably have more information to put on your resume than you think. Experiences like babysitting, lawn mowing, and volunteering all help to show valuable work skills that employers want to see.

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Free High School Student Resume Templates for Teens. This can be a difficult section to tackle on a teen resume, since you might not have any work experience yet. Don’t worry though. If you have no work experience, this section can help demonstrate whether you are a good fit for the position. If you start with the job listings instead of with the blank page, the hiring manager's keywords will guide you, and help you focus on which of your academic or after-school experiences have prepared you for this first step in your career. First Resume Example.

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Sep 06,  · A lack of job experience doesn't mean a lack of work experience. If you are a teenager looking for your first payroll job, punch up your resume by focusing on your strengths, whatever they may be. Welcome to Jobs For Teens Headquarters Our website is dedicated to helping teens find jobs. Getting a job is tough, but getting a job when you .